Previous Exhibition

Michael Phillips —
Recent Works on Paper

Nov 18 – Dec 2, 2016

About the Artist      

 “The day capitalism is forced to tolerate non-capitalist societies in its midst and to acknowledge limits in its quest for domination, the day it is forced to recognize that its supply of raw material will not be endless, is the day change will come. If there is any hope for the world at all, it does not live in climate-change conference rooms or in cities with tall buildings. It lives low on the ground, with its arms around the people who go to battle every day to protect their forests, their mountains and their rivers because they know that the forests, the mountains and the rivers protect them.

The first step towards re-imagining a world gone terribly wrong would be to stop the annihilation of those who have a different imagination—an imagination that is outside of capitalism as well as communism. An imagination which has an altogether different understanding of what constitutes happiness and fulfillment. To gain this philosophical space, it is necessary to concede some physical space for the survival of those who may look like the keepers of our past, but who may really be the guides to our future.”

Arundhati Roy, The Trickledown Revolution, Outlook, 2010

Photography: Eva Phillips

About the Artist

Michael Phillips

 Born 1959. Lives and works in Fortitude Valley, Brisbane, Australia. 

About the Curator

Beth Jackson

Beth is a curator of contemporary art with over twenty years’ professional experience working in the gallery sector and in the realm of public art, across public and private spheres. Her curatorial consultancy practice Artfully, established in 2012, seeks to embed art meaningfully within social contexts and built environments. For Beth, curating is not simply about having a bird’s eye view of the field, picking ‘winners’ or ‘rising stars’. It is a deliberate investment in process and dialogue between curator and artist, between artists and fellow creatives, fostering living and ongoing conversations, encouraging peer review, collaborations, sharing and problem solving. Involvements include studio visits, camping on locations, sharing informal joint activities, more formal workshop scenarios, and facilitating professional introductions and networks. Side Gallery is an opportunity to have intimate and serious one-on-one conversations with artists for a particular ‘snapshot’ within their practice. Beth has abiding interests in feminism and environmentalism. She produces art criticism for journals such as Eyeline Magazine as well as for exhibition catalogues and other publications.