Previous Exhibition

Daniel Sherington —
Artist As...

Apr 18 – May 3, 2019

About the Artist      

‘Artist As…’, explores the implications surrounding the cultural landscape, symbolism, and particularly the masculine, tropes of artists in Australia. Utilising a visual vocabulary and stereotypical symbolism to exploit the idea of the valued Australian landscape artworks; the crushed beer can becomes a cultural landscape. Sherington adds humour, self-deprecation, philosophy and stereotype by means of crudely-sprawled statements in ultramarine blue across the finely drawn still life cans. Ultramarine blue, associated with Australian artists such as Whiteley and as seen on the Australian flag, becomes a catch-all for the Australian Palette. 

About the Artist

Daniel Sherington

As a young Australian artist, it is easy to see drawing subservient and invalidated to that of Australian painting. My practice is a response to this relationship, exploring the boundaries and interactions of drawing and painting within the context of the validated and commoditised ‘Australian’ image.

Continuing the artistic narrative established by the post-modernists, my work engages with a  visual vocabulary to explore socially responsive ideas and concepts. My work is rooted in drawing and draughtsmanship. All works stem from this cornerstone of drawing, as it exists as an artistic truth of mine.

Through the visual manipulation of iconographic qualities and artistic precedents, the lines between drawing and painting are blurred. The preferred Australian genre highlighted through the undulations and creases of the crushed can - evoking the idea of a ‘cultural landscape’. The Brett Whiteley iconised colour, Ultramarine Blue, being used as a greater representation for what can be considered an ‘Australian Palette’. The painting itself being viewed as the embodiment of the validated idea and concept – with this being translated into the concept being explicitly stated through painted text. The idea of the drawing becoming a vehicle for this idea, and in this light existing as the ‘canvas’ the paint lies on.